What Would You Wear To Meet Wills And Kate?

There's a dresscode, apparently.

We’re no strangers to the wonders of Kate Middleton’s wardrobe, but have you ever thought about what you would wear to meet the Royal Family’s most famous couple?

Journalists in America are now having to seriously consider this as they’ve been given a right royal dressing down by the Palace. A new style guide has been given to anyone who will be covering Prince William and Kate Middleton’s trip to the States, which gets underway on December 7th this year, giving an indication as to what standards are expected by the royal couple.

Reporters aren’t generally known for their sartorial elegance and this just won’t do when meeting Prince William and The Duchess of Cambridge. Male journalists have been asked to opt for a tie and shirt and females a skirt or trouser suit. So it’s not exactly top hats and tails, but crumpled t-shirts, jeans and trainers will not be acceptable – in fact, anyone who tries to even get in the room with this sort of attire will be banned from accessing the royals altogether.

The rules are as follows:

‘Journalists wishing to cover royal engagements, whether in the United Kingdom or abroad, should comply with the dress code on formal occasions out of respect for the guests of the queen, or any other member of the royal family.’

‘Smart attire for men includes the wearing of a jacket and tie, and for women a trouser or skirt suit.’

‘Those wearing jeans or trainers will not be admitted and casually dressed members of the media will be turned away. This also applies to technicians.’

For anyone else unsure of how to dress or indeed conduct themselves when meeting a royal can also head over to the official website of the Monarchy for such tips as:

‘Members of the Royal Family are content with being photographed at most times during an engagement: those to avoid, however, are while they have food or a glass in their hand or during a meal, although it is quite in order for a photograph to be taken during a Loyal Toast, or immediately before food is served.’

‘Similarly, photographs may be taken when they rise to speak and for the first minute after they start talking.’

Or:

‘It is particularly unfortunate if photographers are allowed to insert themselves between the Royal visitors and whomever or whatever it is they are meeting or watching.’

You have been warned.

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