The royal family is shattering gender stereotypes with Prince George’s new hobby

This is lovely.

Royals are more like us than we think – with the Windsors being refreshingly relatable.

Gone are the days where we would only see a royal waving from Buckingham Palace balcony. Now they are accessible, all over social media, from Princess Eugenie dominating Instagram with her behind the scenes royal snaps to the Queen and Prince Philip’s Twitter account. They even share our TV addictions, love of emojis and favourite foods.

Gone are the days too when the royals were considered too stuffy and traditional, with the royals known in recent years for shattering gender stereotypes, something spearheaded by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

The latest shattering of gender stereotypes however centred around Prince George and Princess Charlotte, or rather their hobbies.

HRH The Duchess of Cambridge/REX/Shutterstock

It was announced last week that Princess Charlotte was following in the Queen’s footsteps, taking up horse riding, something according to Kate, she is taking to well.

Then, this week, Prince George’s new hobby was revealed and it’s perfect.

This autumn, the future king will be learning ballet.

Yes, it has been confirmed that five-year-old George will start ballet lessons at St Thomas’s Battersea, along with new extracurricular activities from swimming to choir.

Prince George first day at school

‘Extra Ballet is very popular amongst pupils in Years 1 – 8,’ it reads on the school website. ‘Pupils are prepared for the examinations of The Royal Academy of Dance and also for the school’s biennial Ballet Show.’

‘The syllabus consists of three dance disciplines:

Ballet – the foundation and the most important part of the syllabus.

Free Movement – this has been influenced by other dance styles such as jazz, contemporary and classical Greek dance and incorporates movements from them all.

Character – the theatrical presentation of national dance using original ethnic dance and music which has been freely adapted for the theatre. The three styles – Hungarian, Russian and Polish – were selected because of their historic importance in the development of the nineteenth century full-length classical ballet.

Ballet is taught to a very high standard at Thomas’s Battersea and our pupils always achieve 100% success in their examinations.’

So Princess Charlotte is horse riding, Prince George is doing ballet – what does that leave for Prince Louis?

We can’t wait to see.

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