Dogfishing is the dating trend you probably know all too well

There are *so many* dating trends these days that it can be hard to keep up with rubbish relationship behaviour. It all started with ghosting, a term coined to describe when someone you’re seeing suddenly disappears into thin air, and since then many more have been added to the list – cushioning (lining up another partner before dumping the one you’ve got), sneating (dating someone for a free dinner) and orbiting (when the person who has ghosted you continues to be your biggest fan on social media).

Alas, there is another dating trend on the scene and anyone who has ever used a dating app will likely know about it.

Dogfishing is something that crops up again and again, and you’ve probably experienced it yourself when you’ve been swiping to find someone to hook-up with/date/marry in Vegas on a whim.

So what is it?

Dogfishing is essentially when you come across the person with a perfect profile – their bio is witty, their taste in music is excellent and, importantly, they have a dog in at least one of their photos. Winner.

But is that dog really theirs? Have they borrowed it purely to catch your eye? Will you meet up to find out that they don’t, and never have, owned a pet pup?

If they’re selling themselves as a dog owner when in fact they’re fur baby-free, that’s dogfishing.

It never goes down well, as this Bumble user illustrates.

Dating coach Erika Ettin told The Washington Post that dogfishing may indicate that someone has nurturing qualities.

‘Sometimes women subconsciously equate things like how a man treats his dog is how he would treat a partner,’ she said.

‘That’s the main thing: stop borrowing dogs. It’s just odd when you’re using someone else’s dog online, and it seems like you’re trying too hard.’

Basically, don’t use your pal’s pooch to get a match.

Simple.

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