Milan Fashion Week proves even a pandemic can’t stop fashion

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  • London Fashion Week may have been different this year, but if it proved anything, it was that a pandemic cannot quash fashion designers’ creative spirit. And from the looks of it so far, Milan Fashion Week has also risen to the occasion, with a mix of both digital and physical shows.

    Here are all the standout moments, from the Fendi spring/summer 2021 collection to Max Mara’s show inspired by rebirth and renewal.

    Max Mara women are rebuilding the world

    For SS21, the Max Mara woman is all about reconstructing the world, better than it was before, ‘like the indomitable heroines of the Renaissance, in every field’. For this, she needs a new uniform of course. A uniform which looks like a modern version of the tabard: a parka with utilitarian pockets, snap fasteners and drawstrings. It looks like a practical jumpsuit, and a re-imagined trench coat, like wide leg trousers and embellished sweatshirts. And of course, she still needs a killer suit, but with a cape, because she’s a hero after all.

    Fendi turns to family

    Silvia Venturini Fendi reflected on time spent with her family for her final womenswear collection at the helm of the Italian label. The traditional mixes with the modern, the casual with the glam. Think embroidered house coats and flared tunics, apron dresses in silk duchesse, embroidered tulle and gazar, and formal pieces softened by casual detailing. The familial theme extended to the runway, with models that were mothers, fathers, sisters and sons, indluding Edie and Olympia Campbell, Cecilia and Lucas Chancellor, and Philippe and Dries Haseldonckx.

    Dolce & Gabbana recycle and make patchwork cool

    For their ‘Patchwork of Sicily’ collection, Dolce & Gabbana recycled fabric pieces from past seasons to create new ones, a beautiful patchwork that pays tribute to each cultural influences that makes up the island in which Domenico Dolce grew up. He said in a video presentation, ‘It’s about not throwing away even the oldest thing. You might have old sweaters, trousers, shirts, and you can recreate from other things something new that is yours. But what’s important to us is that every piece is interpreted by skilled hands.’

    Scroll down to see more of the beautiful looks to come out of the Milan Fashion Week SS21 shows.

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