This controversial ranking of ice lollies has divided the nation

Ranking some of the nations favourite things always ends in a heated debate. Remember the Channel 5 Britain’s Favourite Crisp debacle? Earlier this year, celebs discussed their favourite snacks and some of the UK’s most popular crisps were ranked in order of preference. It was labelled a ‘national scandal’ for various reasons – Chilli Doritos made the top three for crying out loud – and the whole thing caused outrage.

Now, there’s another ranking to rile you up.

Digital creator Niki Albon decided to share how he would order some of the most popular British ice lollies, listing them from ‘God tier’ to ‘awful’.

He tweeted: ‘I don’t care what anyone says, *THIS* is how you rank our ice lollies. Anything missing isn’t worth the freezer space.’

The list has proved controversial and has had thousands of ice lolly fans chipping in to question these bold claims.

Why? Because a Jubbly (a what?) made it to the ‘God tier’, while Mini Milks somehow ranked ‘top tier’ and yet the delicious and thirst-quenching Calippo only placed at ‘mid tier’, with the childhood favourite Twister simply deemed ‘awful’.

That’s why.

Niki’s followers were quick to respond to the tweet, with one angrily replying: ‘Niki. I can agree on the Feast. But a Nobbly Bobbly is worth more than your soul. Putting a Twister so low is so insulting to so many. Use your platform responsibly or GTFO.’

Another added: ‘You really thought you did something putting rocket lollies at the bottom huh?’

One simply replied: ‘Honeyyyy noooo.’

Others were appalled that some of ice lolly icons didn’t get the recognition they deserve, with one person writing: ‘Absolutely wrong. Zapp, Fab and Twister belong in the god tier.’

Not everyone disagreed, however, with one fan writing: ‘I’m so relieved someone finally puts Fabs at the bottom.’

Another said: ‘To be honest, in this weather… all ice lollies belong in the God tier.’

Hear, hear – that’s one thing we can all agree on.

Reading now

Popular Life stories