Felicity Huffman has controversially been released from prison early

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  • You would have to have been living under a rock not to have heard of the recent college admissions scandal, with the recently unearthed scheme reportedly being the largest college admissions scandal of all time.

    The scheme in question saw parents bribe school officials and college coaches to get their children into top colleges, either by cheating on standardised tests or by getting the children accepted as college athletes despite often not even playing the sport.

    And among the parents involved were some very famous faces, with Desperate Housewives actress Felicity Huffman and 90210 actress Lori Loughlin among the parents charged for their involvement in what investigators are calling ‘Operation Varsity Blues’.

    Felicity Huffman was sentenced earlier this year for her involvement, with the 56-year-old sentenced to 14 days in prison after she pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud earlier this year.

    It was revealed this weekend however that Felicity had been released early, with the actress leaving prison on Friday after serving 11 days of her 14-day sentence.

    The reasons behind Felicity’s early release are centred around the dates, with the Bureau of Prisons able to release inmates early if they are set to leave on a weekend or legal holiday.

    The decision however has proven controversial, with members of the public voicing their outrage on social media.

    ‘Felicity huffman….didn’t….even…..complete…. a two week sentence?’ , one user tweeted, while another posted: ‘I have the same cold that I had when Felicity Huffman reported to jail.’

    As well as jail time, Felicity must pay a fine of $30,000 and complete 250 hours of community service.

    ‘After this, you’ve paid your dues,’ Judge Talwani is reported to have told the actress at the sentencing. ‘I think without this sentence you would be looking at a future with the community around you asking why you had gotten away with this.’

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