quitting your job

Thinking about quitting your job? Make sure you read this first

We know you're frustrated, but before you do anything drastic, here's what to know before you leap

Quitting your job in haste is probably not the best move in the current shaky climate, and stats show that 23 per cent of people who quit a job regret it later. But if you’re fed up and something has to give, make sure you take these steps before doing making your next big move.

Mike Lewis, author of When To Jump: If The Job You Have Isn’t The Life You Want, knows all about making drastic changes. Working a prestigious corporate job in Boston, Massachusetts, he harboured a childhood dream to become a professional sportsman. Unsure of his options, he decided to reach out to others who had left their comfortable lifestyles to pursue their true desires. Buoyed by their stories, Mike eventually made his jump: he quit his job and spent 18 months successfully playing squash on the international circuit.

Here, Mike gives us the lowdown on what you need to do before your personal ‘leap of faith’, whether that’s asking for a pay rise, or packing it all in for a new start.

Quitting your job

‘Resist the urge to go in a ball of fury. While you may be leaving the firm, the people in it may reappear in your professional life. Instead, use lunch breaks to share plans with colleagues and peers who you respect and trust. Ask for advice about what to do and who to meet next. Above all, leave on good terms (or the best terms possible). I call this “sewing your safety net”.’

Asking for a raise

‘Do your current job well – so well that you become invaluable to your manager, peers and team. When you make yourself critical to the department and the organisation as a whole, your managers will gladly discuss how to afford you, because at this point they can’t afford to lose you.’

Moving internally

‘Regardless of what the internal jump is, engage in some “pre-jump practice”. Seek out those who have made a similar move before, understand the most pressing needs of the organisation and speak with executives to uncover what keeps them up at night – a competitor, market constraints, a new launch. Then, determine how your skill set 
fits in and offer to help solve it.’

Starting your own business

‘You won’t benefit one iota from scrolling through Instagram or LinkedIn posts about success stories. Look beyond sugar-coated tales of entrepreneurship and hunt down the failures. It will be these stories of trial and error that will most effectively guide your trajectory before and after you go it alone.’

For much more careers inspiration, practical advice and workshops, join us and a host of incredible CEOs, business women and influencers for Marie Claire’s Future Shapers Live 2018

 

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