Ariel Winter has no time for your body shaming

‘We need to spend more time pleasing ourselves and caring less about what other people say’

Body shaming is a horrible phenomenon – and if you thought you had it rough, spare a thought for Ariel Winter.

The 19-year-old was thrust into the spotlight at age 11, playing teenager Alex Dunphy on US sitcom Modern Family, and it’s safe to say that growing up in front of the media opened her up to a hell of a lot of body shaming.

She has been lambasted for her red carpet fashion choices, slammed for dating someone ten years her senior and criticised for having breast reduction surgery. Now, Ariel Winter has had enough, using her platform to encourage self-acceptance and block out the hate.

‘So many years I tried to change my appearance, and I tried to do different things to make myself so everyone is going to accept me, and they didn’t,’ Ariel explained in an interview with LaPalme magazine. ‘The thing we all have to realise is the media is going to portray you the way they want to portray you and it’s not going to change. The only person’s opinion that matters, the only person that gets to have a say in you, is you.’

‘We need to spend more time pleasing ourselves and caring less about what other people say,’ she continued, going on to explain how the online attention made her feel.

‘It sucks,’ she explained. ‘It 100% sucks. I hate reading stories about myself and that’s why I don’t.’

In fact, it seems like the 19-year-old has no time for body shaming comments, with her plate full already.

‘My goal is actually to get my law degree,’ she explained. ‘I’ve always wanted to be a lawyer, and while I love acting and will probably do it for the rest of my days, I definitely think that it’s important for me to go to school and do something I’m passionate about.’

‘At the end of the day you have to remember, “You know what, I feel good and that’s all that matters , and other people can go buzz off.”’

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves.

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