Women say sexism is dead

Despite many women feeling they've reached the glass ceiling or experienced derogatory remarks or insensitive jokes because of their gender, the majority do not believe that Britain is a sexist place

Less than four in ten women say they have experienced discriminating behaviour or derogatory remarks because of their gender, with the majority of men and women think both sexes are equally capable of handling traditionally male tasks.

The poll, conducted for a group of charities and pressure groups to mark International Women’s Day, suggests that women are far more concerned with the day-to-day problems they encounter than fighting a battle for equality.

But Amnesty International’s UK director, Kate Allen, says the findings still display a worrying gender gap. ‘Unless attempts are made to change such attitudes in every section of society, some women will always be treated as second class citizens.

Amnesty International has found from its work that it is these negative views which in the most extreme instances can lead to abusive behaviour towards women and a basic denial of women’s rights.’

According to the survey, only one in 20 women feel that the greatest problem facing them is sexism at work, although three times as many men believe gender discrimination is a women’s biggest challenge.

The poll of 1,028 participants found 47% of women did not believe men and women were treated equally, and 38% of women said they had personally experienced sexist remarks and behaviour. This figure rose to 60% among women under 30.

Interestingly, 15% of men said they had also been on the receiving end of sexist behaviour and gender discrimination.

Do you agree that sexism is dying out? Perhaps you think it is more rife than ever? Whatever your thoughts, let us know by posting your comment in the box below.

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