Smallville star Allison Mack has been released on bail after allegedly recruiting sex slaves

Allison Mack has been released on a $5 million bail for her alleged involvement in a global sex trafficking ring, one that apparently even tried to recruit Emma Watson

She’s best known for playing reporter Chloe Sullivan in Noughties drama Smallville. But now actress Allison Mack has been accused of recruiting vulnerable women into a sex cult.

Mack, 35, was released on bail today after being charged with sex trafficking and conspiracy for her alleged ‘senior role’ in an organisation known as Nxivm. The organisation, which presented itself as a self-help group, was run by 57-year-old Keith Raniere, who was arrested last month in Mexico.

Now tweets from 2016 have been presented which apparently show Allison Mack inviting actress Emma Watson to join ‘a unique human development and women’s movement.’

‘Emma Watson I participate in a unique human development and women’s movement I’d love to tell you about’ she tweeted in February 2016, ‘As a fellow actress I can relate so well to your vision and what you want to see in the world. I think we could work together. Let me know if you’re willing to chat.’

Mack in 2006, when she was a star of Smallville

Prosecutors accuse Raniere (known in the group as ‘Vanguard’) and Mack of luring vulnerable women into the organisation on the premise of ‘female empowerment.’

But the women were then allegedly branded with Raniere’s initials, forced to have sex with him and made to eat 800 calorie diets to satisfy his preference for thin women. Nude photographs and personal details of the women were kept to blackmail them in case they attempted to break away.

An expose of Nxivm by The New York Times described how the women were ‘told to undress and lie on a massage table, while three others restrained her legs and shoulders’ before a Nxivm official, Lauren Salzman, told them to say ‘Master, please brand me, it would be an honour.’ Nvixm has several bases around America, as well as Canada and Mexico, and an estimated 16,000 people have enrolled in its courses since the 1990s.

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