Being single is costing you A LOT more than you think

Turns out single life isn't exactly wallet-friendly

Ok, so we know that being single can mean you spend a little bit more. A tinder date here, a spontaneous night out there and suddenly it all begins to add up. But surely it can’t be as expensive as being in a couple and having to splash out on romantic dinners and fancy birthday gifts?

Wrong. Apparently being single leaves you significantly worse off that being in a couple – almost £6k so in fact.

According to a survey undertaken by Voucher Codes Pro, Britons save an average of £5772 each year by being in a relationship.

The poll questioned 2,125 Britons aged 18-30, of which 1062 been for at least two years, and 1063 were single. It found that being single means you spend on average £150 of your disposable income each week, compared to £39 if you’re in a couple.

This price difference arose main from a difference in priorities. Singletons explained the main reasons for their extra expenditure as nights out, take away food and eating out, as well as clothing and groceries.

Meanwhile, couples said their spending went on home furnishings, presents, holiday, takeaways and groceries.

When asked why single people spent more more than those in a relationship, 62% of respondents said it was due to going out more, 24% said those in a relationship can “try less”, and the remaining 14% reasoned that it was because those in a relationship can split everything, from rent to food to bills.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the research also found that singletons drink almost three times as much as those in a couple. On average, singletons spend £45 a week on alcohol compared to the £17 spent by people in a relationship. But then, who really can face a tinder date stone cold sober?

So if you’re single and feeling broke, don’t worry – there is a reason why you’re so much skinter than your friends in a relationship.

Want to waste less money on rubbish tinder dates? Find out how to create the perfect dating app profile.  

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