Hillary Clinton Says That Hair And Make Up Is A Tax On Women’s Time – Do You Agree?

'It's a daily challenge,' she says.

Hillary Clinton has described allowing time to do her hair and make up before work as ‘a daily challenge’ and a tax on women’s time that men don’t have to pay.

During a Facebook Q&A, the presidential candidate agreed with a statement that women have to work extra hard to be ‘presentable’ for work.

‘Every morning, as my boyfriend zips out the door and I spend 30+ minutes getting ready, I wonder about how the “hair and makeup tax” affects other women — especially ones I admire in high-pressure, public-facing jobs,’ asked Libby Brittain.

‘I know these questions can seem fluffy, but as a young professional woman, I’d genuinely love to hear about how you manage getting ready each morning (especially during your time travelling as Secretary of State and now on the campaign trail) while staying focused on the “real” work ahead of you that day?’

Actually not fluffy, we feel, but an interesting point about the expectations on women to wear make-up in the workplace.

‘Amen, sister – you’re preaching to the choir,’ Hillary replied. ‘It’s a daily challenge. I do the best I can – and as you may have noticed, some days are better than others! –H’

Millions of women love doing their hair and make up (for themselves) as part of their identity, so can we really call this a ‘tax’?

That said, are we saying that a woman doesn’t look presentable for work if she isn’t wearing make up?

Hillary’s reply kick-started a wider discussion in the comments field below…

‘Agreed! It’s hard to understand the balance of wanting to spend my time on other things, but wanting people to take me seriously in professional meetings,’ said Ellen Chisa.

‘I read this story about a high power creative executive who had the same issue until one day she bought “suits” which were white blouses and black skirts. That’s all she wore,’ shared Karen Nyhlen, which also relates back to a comment President Obama made about only owning blue and grey suits because it cuts down the number of decisions he has to make every day.

‘I tell my female students to look professional and comfortable, but to never sacrifice the sleep or prep time their male colleagues are getting in favor of getting ready,’ added Katharine Mcfarlane.

Tell us what you think on Twitter @MarieClaireUK.

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