Must-read career tips from 5 female future shapers

Always think big...

What does it take to start your own business? How do you make yourself heard when your swimming in a sea of loud voices and set backs? Take heed from these five inspirational, agenda-setting women, who know a thing or two about pushing boundaries in the business sphere.

Feeling inspired? Find out about all the winners of our Future Shapers Awards in partnership with Neutrogena and see how these women are shaping the future for us all…

Jasmine Hemsley: Co-founder of HEMSLEY + HEMSLEY

‘Always believe. Go with the flow and know when it’s the right time to stop and the right time to start. And enjoy all your experiences, because even the bad ones you learn from.

‘I’m sure there were many things I cried into my pillow about, but I can’t remember them now because they actually didn’t matter.  So don’t take everything to heart.’

Katarina Johnson-Thompson: Olympic heptathlete

‘I always think you have to do what you love – or else you’ll have no passion and become bored. My mum always said I needed hobbies alongside school and I was lucky enough to find one that I love aged 12!’

Sharmadean Reid MBE: Founder of WAH London

‘You can always turn a “no” into a “yes”. When I first started out, I applied to open a 
nail bar at Topshop and was turned down, which was so deflating. Later, I pushed for another meeting, which resulted in us getting a pop-up store that later turned into a permanent Topshop concession that we held for four years. Persistence and hard work pay off.

Millie Mackintosh: Fashion designer

‘Always think about the end goal. I remember how I felt when I was younger and how I wanted to have a clothing line and now I have it. It’s an amazing feeling.’

Julia Salasky: CEO and founder of CrowdJustice

‘Push doors until they open. I met every person in the law industry, tapped up every connection who could possibly help, and put my foot in every door. I wouldn’t even call it networking so much as bashing my head against a wall until someone would talk to me.’

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