Scientists make breast cancer breakthrough

Researchers in Boston have discovered a treatment that could kill breast cancer cells which drive the growth of tumours.

A team of a scientists in Boston have discovered a treatment that could kill breast cancer cells which drive the growth of tumours.

Researchers have identified that salinomycin, a chemical used as an antibactierial drug to fatten chickens, targets and kills 100 times more cancer cells than current chemotherapy treatments.

The results of the study are thought to reveal some of the most significant breakthroughs in the fight against cancer.

Eric Lander, an author of the paper, told the Telegraph: ‘Many therapies kill the bulk of a tumour only to see it regrow. This raises the prospect of new kinds of anti-cancer therapies.’

Tests were successfully carried out on mice, but scientists warn that it could take several more years of research before they establish whether salinomycin will have the same effect on humans.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Britain, with 45,000 women being diagnosed with the disease each year. Currently, eight out of ten women survive for at least five years after being diagnosed.

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