Cervical cancer hope

Oestrogen-block drugs eradicate disease in mice

New research suggests that oestrogen-blocking drugs used to treat breast cancer may be effective against cervical cancer.

The drugs, which block the effect of the female hormone oestrogen, have been found in tests to eliminate cervical cancer in mice.

Scientists are hopeful they may have the same effect in humans, reports the Telegraph.

‘There are many similarities to how cervical cancer develops and manifests itself in women and in mice,’ said Dr Paul Lambert, one of the researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

‘We have begun to test whether the drugs are as effective in treating cervical cancer in human cells as they are in our mice.’
The tests also showed that mice with pre-cancerous cells did not develop cancer after being treated with the drugs.

The medicines tested were the breast cancer drugs fulvestrant and raloxifene. Further lab tests are necessary before the treatments could be licensed but since both drugs are already approved for patients, some safety trials could be avoided.

Cervical cancer, the disease that killed Jade Goody, is triggered by the human papillomavirus (HPV), but it is believed to be ‘fuelled’ by oestrogen.


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