Rashida Jones just called out critics of the Golden Globes red-carpet blackout

‘This is not a silent protest’

The Golden Globes 2018, airing on 7th January, are set to serve as a platform for political protest – and while last year’s focus was protesting Trump’s immigration ban – this year will target sexual harassment in Hollywood.

The past few months have been consumed by a shocking wave of sexual harassment allegations against Hollywood heavyweights, prompted by the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment allegations, seeing over 50 women come forward with claims of harassment and in some cases assault against the 65-year-old.

It was therefore reported last week that actresses will be wearing black to the Golden Globe awards in protest – from nominees Jessica Chastain and Meryl Streep to Emma Stone.

It seems however, that not everyone is happy with the political stand, with actress Rose McGowan – one of the first to speak out about Harvey Weinstein – voicing her outrage against the idea.

Weinsteingate

Harvey Weinstein. Credit: Rex

According to Rose, a symbolic ‘silent’ protest is completely counter-productive, with the actress explaining how ‘silence is the problem.’

‘Actresses, like Meryl Streep, who happily worked for The Pig Monster, are wearing black @GoldenGlobes in a silent protest,’ she posted. ‘YOUR SILENCE is THE problem. You’ll accept a fake award breathlessly & affect no real change.’

She continued: ‘I despise your hypocrisy. Maybe you should all wear Marchesa’ – a dig at the fashion house that Weinstein’s estranged wife founded.

Rose isn’t the only person to have opposed the ban, with some people finding problems with the concept of ‘silent protest.’

Rose McGowan

Rose McGowan. Credit: Rex

According to Hollywood actress Rashida Jones however, this couldn’t be further from the truth.

‘This is not a silent protest,’ the 41-year-old actress explained. ’I don’t think why we wear black is divisive as much as it is being discussed and debated without all the facts. Many women on the red carpet will discuss what’s important to them about their choice to protest and wear black. We wear black to stand in solidarity with our sisters and to say time’s up on this imbalance of power and the abuses that come with it, regardless of what industry you work in.’

She continued: ‘It’s time for every workplace to look more like our world, where women have equal representation.’

‘I have been so moved by the quick community that has come about in the past few months,’ she explained. ‘I’m in awe of the passion and determination and thoughtfulness of the women I’ve been working with. It’s so powerful to experience this moment all together. The deep-rooted inequality in our industry felt impenetrable, and, in an instant, we felt hope that this moment could possibly effect real change, in our industry and beyond.’

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